Airlines: I was in a plane crash

Airlines are coming to grips with the impact of the death of one of their pilots, a British man who went missing while flying a luxury plane from Paris to Dubai last year.

The man, who had a history of alcohol and drug abuse, was found dead in a hotel room last month.

His body has not been formally identified, but his parents have told the BBC that he died from an apparent drug overdose.

The plane he was on went down near the Lebanese border on October 10, 2015, and its wreckage was found two days later near the city of Taiz, Saudi Arabia.

In a statement on Friday, British Airways said it had reached out to the family, but it had not given details on the cause of death.

It added that it had launched an investigation and is working with the Lebanese authorities to establish the circumstances of the crash.

Barclays said it was “deeply saddened” by the loss of David Coggan, who was known to be “excellent, professional and highly regarded in our industry”.

“Barclay has taken immediate action to investigate the cause and circumstances of this tragic loss, including speaking with the pilot’s family.””

Barclaws aviation safety team has launched an independent investigation into the circumstances surrounding the incident, which is ongoing. “

Barclay has taken immediate action to investigate the cause and circumstances of this tragic loss, including speaking with the pilot’s family.”

Barclaws aviation safety team has launched an independent investigation into the circumstances surrounding the incident, which is ongoing.

It has been a deeply traumatic experience for the family and the entire Barclays team.

“Barclasses parent company, Aeromexico, said it is “aware of the news of David’s passing”, but declined to comment further.

Reuters reported that Mr Cogagan had been on a trip to the Middle East to celebrate his daughter’s first birthday.

Mr Cogagna was a former airline pilot who spent most of his career flying Airbus jets from Paris-Charles de Gaulle airport to the US.

His disappearance sparked an international search, with more than 50 countries looking for him.

Britain’s Foreign Office said the airline is assisting the Lebanese government with its investigation.

British Airways, a UK-based airline, confirmed it was investigating the cause but added that “all our thoughts are with the family”.

Barriers to travel in the Middle Eastern market have been tightened following a series of deadly attacks on people on the continent in recent years, including the 2014 killing of French police officer Xavier Jadot by suspected ISIS fighters.

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